Investing in Young People’s Potential in Tech

It’s important that we bring the potential of technology to our young people for their (and our) future.

As Best Buy and Geek Squad bring more teen tech centers online, here is what they’ve learned: The Gift Of Insight: Five Lessons In Preparing Youth For A Tech-Reliant Future.

Sub-$200 Back to School Laptops

It’s time for college students to be gearing up for another school year.

Bill Wills of WTAM 1100 Newsradio and I discussed Back to School tech, including the recent trend of sub-$200 laptops.

College students can find a number of great deals by visiting the Best Buy Back to School site.

Netgear Nighthawk DST Tech Tips

A video how-to on setting up the Netgear Nighthawk DST router that I helped with. I am the Online Support Agent connecting via remote chat shown in the video.

The interesting bit is that I was literally remote in this case. The video was filmed in a studio in Minnesota, I was connecting in via Ohio.

Virtual Reality is (finally) here. Mostly.

Virtual Reality has long been a “coming soon” technology, but with the current and upcoming product releases, expect VR to be big on Christmas lists later this year. I spoke to the Arizona Republic recently about today’s biggest virtual reality players, including the Occulus Rift, HTC Vive, andSamsung Gear VR.

My personal pick for the likely winner this year will be the Playstation VR. With 35 million households owning a PS4, I think there will be enough demand for the $499.99 launch bundle to create a sizable base for future growth.

Tips for Stress-Free Parental Tech Support

Every family has that one person they count on to provide some level of tech support. Like many, I’m the go-to guy when my parents have an issue with their tablet, printer or TV.

I was happy to help provide tips to the The Wall Street Journal for their article Are You the Family Tech Support? My tips for those asked to help our their family with tech issues:

  • Reassure your parents: Fear, not smarts, is the biggest hurdle.
  • Find out what your parents were trying to do when the problem happened. Understanding the end goal can help diagnose what went wrong.
  • When possible, have parents do the actual troublehsooting themselves. Knowledge is power – and comfort.
  • Ditch technical terms. Talk in clear, everyday language. When explaining something, us an analogy.
  • Try Skype or Facetime for problem solving from afar. Remote-access programs may also be helpful.
  • Know your limits. If a problem is outside your comfort zone, call a professional.